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Who We Are

Since 1917, Lutheran Social Services of the National Capital Area (LSSNCA), a human services and immigration relief and refugee welcome agency, has accompanied those in need throughout Maryland, Virginia, and Washington, D.C. to foster resiliency, self-sufficiency, and access to opportunities. We provide wraparound services that bolster the long welcome for families, youth, children, and individuals rebuilding their lives in the D.C. metro area. 

Motivated daily by our belief in the inherent dignity of all, LSSNCA’s innovative participant-informed programs serve refugees, forced migrants, immigrants, children and youth, and underserved communities by filling in the gaps. Piloting initiatives like the area’s first camp for kids impacted by the HIV/AIDS crisis, originating local pro se asylum workshops for Afghan Allies, launching a Resource Center to serve as a community hub for all recently arrived program participants, and offering myriad trauma-informed mental health support services, LSSNCA strives to create an inclusive community of well-being where people thrive.

  • LSSNCA Program Participant from Afghanistan
    LSSNCA Program Participant from Afghanistan

    "When you give me a sweater and I ask you for a coat; when you give me a coat and I ask for food; when you give me food and I ask for a laptop, it’s not because I don’t understand the value of this sweater, it’s because you are family and I know we can ask you and you will help us."

Our Impact

From the Newsroom

LSSNCA expresses concern that the asylum adjustments rule announced May 9 by the Biden administration may substantially elevate the asylum rejection rate for migrants lacking legal representation and sufficient time to navigate the asylum process.

When the teenager fled Afghanistan and arrived in the U.S., he was alone. He has since seen a community come together to help him and his four brothers. ... How the five brothers, who range in age from 8 to 21, all ended up living in Loudoun County is a story that starts with them getting separated at an airport in Afghanistan. Their family was one of the many that crowded the grounds around the international airport in Kabul in 2021 in hopes of evacuating as the United States withdrew its troops.

Photo credit: Theresa Vargas/The Washington Post

“We began interviewing refugee doctors in late 2022, learning about their passion for medicine and some of the barriers they face in returning to medical practice,” said Brandi Kilmer, Co-Founder of the Refugee Physicians Advocacy (RPA) Coalition and Community Programs Coordinator - Washington D.C. at TSOS. “It’s been incredibly rewarding to be part of a growing coalition of partners working to remove those barriers. We thank chief-patron Delegate Kathy Tran and our partners at Lutheran Social Services National Capital Area, World Education Services, and NOVA Friends of Refugees for their leadership, and all those who endorsed helping to remove a significant barrier with this bill. It has restored hope to many doctors in our network.”

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